What's in Your Weather Forecast?

Weather disasters seem to have an eye on Asia this summer, although in many other parts of the world are far from immune to the growing chaos mother. If you're not on the weather reports, here are some of the latest headlines:

"Romania on Flood Alert"

"South Asia monsoon toll is 2000."

"At least 13 dead in Pakistan's raining."

"Rivers above alert levels as rain subsides over central Europe."

"Storms batterOhio. "

"Extreme floods affected 500 million people per year."

"Floods, landslides kill 35 in China."

"Flood show that for disaster risk reduction: UN."

"Hong Kong issues cyclone warning."

"Has the global warming cause NYC Tornado?"

There are a lot more headlines dealing with the tornado in Brooklyn, rising number of deaths in Asia due to flooding, intense heat, which is still widely distributed in parts of the United States, deaths from floods andFamine in Vietnam, deaths from storms in the Philippines, a "mini-tsunami" in Algeria and an announcement by the UN that many parts of the world record-breaking heat waves, are facing floods, storms and cold snaps, including snowfall in Africa.

What is evident from many of these stories is that governments are not prepared to deal with recurring natural disasters. In 2005, an agreement that established the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, to 168 countries in Kobe, Japan signed.Between 2001 and 2005 84% of deaths caused by natural disasters were caused by flooding. It is clear that, like many well-intentioned agreements that many governments have not met their commitments to heart. As more and more frequent flooding is inevitable, what governments do to prevent further loss of lives and property? If governments do their heads in the sand and realize that climate change is a much greater threat than terrorism?
The ISDR said that low investmentreduction in early warning systems, evacuation plans, public education and significantly improved building standards may result in loss of lives and property. Unfortunately, many people are too poor for even these modest efforts, and if a disaster occurs, only has limited resources for relief. The richer countries tend to occupy: "It will not happen here attitude 'and the implications of this line was clearly something in the U.S., Britain and Central Europe.

It must be remembered that much of thisFlooding is heavy and long rains and does not include what happens in relation to the cyclones and monsoon rains. Add this equation problems from heat waves, earthquakes, droughts, freak snow and tornadoes hit the city in cities and it is clear that we could be a few real problems. All of these natural disasters cost billions of dollars in property damage, disrupt economies, the cost of creating chaos and social life. How deep are the pockets of reliefAgencies and nonprofit organizations?

We are in the middle of the highway and the natural environment leads us directly. There is much talk and little action. The policy makers are not always act as we begin scores from year to "take to solve these problems. Perhaps it is so out of hand, that governments fear people how bad things can come. Panic is not a pretty sight. It has been said that disasters are the best in people, but events mayPakistan and India have put this notion to the test grade, is not encouraging.

It is a little easier to help if only a relatively small or remote populations affected by the disaster to offer. If the disaster is widespread, however, brings the worst disaster and not the best of human nature. As the U.S. economy begins to falter under the pressure of home foreclosures and mounting debt, the United States as generous abroad drowning in monsoon andother environmental disasters? If the rest of us Katrina, his face how much is left for others to be especially when we know how to effectively and efficiently deal with such issues? As stated in the "11th Hour", the clock is ticking. What is your forecast?

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